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At least when it comes to on-the-road presence.
Both are niche automakers but Tesla is quickly catching up, the times are changing.

The other day, I took a trip to visit my dad, a distance of about 70 miles one way. While traveling, I saw seven Tesla vehicles on the road. During the trip, I did not see one single Porsche. Porsche is a niche automaker, and while you could say the same about Tesla not long ago, the times are changing.

While I know this was just the luck-of-the-draw that day, it made me wonder. When I got home, I did some internet searching. As best as I can guesstimate, there are probably somewhere around 600,000 Porsche vehicles on the roads today in the United States.

Looking at Tesla's sales figures from InsideEVs, it looks like there may now be upwards of 600,000 Tesla vehicles on U.S. roads, too. It seems Tesla has sold some 1.2 million vehicles across the globe, but it doesn't provide data divided by country.

Porsche is anticipated to average around 62,000 vehicles a year sold in the U.S. over the next several years. Tesla is quickly approaching 200,000 vehicles a year sold in the U.S.

So, as far as I can tell, Tesla is now, or soon will be, surpassing Porsche in the number of vehicles on U.S. roads. Tesla's U.S. vehicle presence is now, or will soon be, greater than that of Porsche. As you drive around the U.S., you will see, on average, a Tesla vehicle more often than you will see a Porsche. The Tesla brand is becoming more visible and ubiquitous in the U.S. than Porsche. Wow.

So ... one brand down, plenty more brands to conquer. Which automotive brand do you think will be the next to fall below Tesla's on-the-road presence?
 

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At least when it comes to on-the-road presence.
Both are niche automakers but Tesla is quickly catching up, the times are changing.

The other day, I took a trip to visit my dad, a distance of about 70 miles one way. While traveling, I saw seven Tesla vehicles on the road. During the trip, I did not see one single Porsche. Porsche is a niche automaker, and while you could say the same about Tesla not long ago, the times are changing.

While I know this was just the luck-of-the-draw that day, it made me wonder. When I got home, I did some internet searching. As best as I can guesstimate, there are probably somewhere around 600,000 Porsche vehicles on the roads today in the United States.

Looking at Tesla's sales figures from InsideEVs, it looks like there may now be upwards of 600,000 Tesla vehicles on U.S. roads, too. It seems Tesla has sold some 1.2 million vehicles across the globe, but it doesn't provide data divided by country.

Porsche is anticipated to average around 62,000 vehicles a year sold in the U.S. over the next several years. Tesla is quickly approaching 200,000 vehicles a year sold in the U.S.

So, as far as I can tell, Tesla is now, or soon will be, surpassing Porsche in the number of vehicles on U.S. roads. Tesla's U.S. vehicle presence is now, or will soon be, greater than that of Porsche. As you drive around the U.S., you will see, on average, a Tesla vehicle more often than you will see a Porsche. The Tesla brand is becoming more visible and ubiquitous in the U.S. than Porsche. Wow.

So ... one brand down, plenty more brands to conquer. Which automotive brand do you think will be the next to fall below Tesla's on-the-road presence?
The last thing a Porsche owner wants is to see flocks of the brand on the road. Porsche has always represented a distinction that identifies someone who is committed to engineering and performance excellence. Claiming the sale of more vehicles would be the opposite goal for a Porsche devotee. This is about craftsmanship not salesmanship.
Volume is usually the enemy of quality. The Porsche strategy is to design and engineer an automobile and then price it. Porsche succeeds because it is able to charge enough to create the necessary profitability to maintain the brand. A Porsche owner feels a level of pride and accomplishment that are all part of the value of Porsche ownership. More sales occur because more people feel this need, but sales does not define success for Porsche.
 

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Hmm..and your point is? Tesla is not Porsche and comparing them is like comparing Apples and Oranges. The only thing they have in common is the both have a credible EV. Soon everyone will have one and this will be a nonsensical conversation.
 

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Hmm..and your point is? Tesla is not Porsche and comparing them is like comparing Apples and Oranges. The only thing they have in common is the both have a credible EV. Soon everyone will have one and this will be a nonsensical conversation.
But I think people will feel a need to continue the comparison because this becomes an issue of quantity vs. quality in a somewhat exaggerated sense. Both have become luxury products based on their pricing, but there will always be that discussion of value vs. price. Porsche choses to pursue unlimited excellence at the cost of selling more cars. This choice occurs for anyone who manufactures and markets an expensive product. Am I willing to forge extra sales because I refuse to compromise on craftsmanship, engineering and detail? A choice every auto manufacturer faces.

Having been an early adopter of a Tesla and had great satisfaction driving and owning a Model S for seven years, I have enormous respect for the role that brand has played in the history of automotive development. That car held its value remarkably and is now the prized possession of a friend who purchased it at the time I took delivery of a Taycan Turbo S.

But the Taycan is a horse of a different color--mine being Mission E white. While both these cars are serious EV's, the Taycan is an emotional force that begs to be driven. Its fit and finish combined with its performance characteristics put in in a different class despite its EV category. I am fascinated by the difference between "good enough" and "the very best."
Isn't that what this discussion is really about?
 

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Yes,
I think you make some very good points. I have four Porsches (including my Turbo, Silver Mission E). I have owned every model in the current lineup except for the Panamara. In addition to over time owning each 911 model since the 964. Each one invokes a slightly different experience however they are unquestionably Porsches. I’m not sure Tesla will ever have “the sole” that is exhibited by Porsche that invokes such passion in it’s owners. I hope we never see a 911 EV
 

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Yes,
I think you make some very good points. I have four Porsches (including my Turbo, Silver Mission E). I have owned every model in the current lineup except for the Panamara. In addition to over time owning each 911 model since the 964. Each one invokes a slightly different experience however they are unquestionably Porsches. I’m not sure Tesla will ever have “the sole” that is exhibited by Porsche that invokes such passion in it’s owners. I hope we never see a 911 EV
Yes,
I think you make some very good points. I have four Porsches (including my Turbo, Silver Mission E). I have owned every model in the current lineup except for the Panamara. In addition to over time owning each 911 model since the 964. Each one invokes a slightly different experience however they are unquestionably Porsches. I’m not sure Tesla will ever have “the sole” that is exhibited by Porsche that invokes such passion in it’s owners. I hope we never see a 911 EV
Yes. I agree with all of this. My own history began with a '68 911. My brothers had C's and SC's but I got the new body style which was unfortunately "a stone". Beautiful, but too heavy for its engine. Next came a 914-6. This was a real hot rod and I had great times at Willow Springs in California at Porsche events. It seemed so fast at the time. A few years went by and I got a 944 5-speed with the 16 valve engine. After that came a 936 with Porsche's first variable valve timing and my first Tiptronic. No Porsches for a while after that until stepped up to a 911 Turbo S
Yes,
I think you make some very good points. I have four Porsches (including my Turbo, Silver Mission E). I have owned every model in the current lineup except for the Panamara. In addition to over time owning each 911 model since the 964. Each one invokes a slightly different experience however they are unquestionably Porsches. I’m not sure Tesla will ever have “the sole” that is exhibited by Porsche that invokes such passion in it’s owners. I hope we never see a 911 EV

I agree completely with all of this. My own Porsche history includes a 912 in '68--too heavy for the engine, but so beautiful at the time. Followed by a 16-valve 944, a 968 with variable valve timing and my first Tiptronic, and then stepping up to a 911 Turbo S -- which got totaled by a 16 year old kid learning to drive. Next a 911 4S which I never really liked, a Panamera GTS which I loved, a 911 GTS, also a love, and now--in the garage next to its stablemate--a 911 Turbo S with an Aerokit.

My Taycan has the Carbon Fiber Sport package and Mission E wheels. Here's a pic.

2737


Great talking with you...
 

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That is a beautiful vehicle,
I also owned the Turbo S 911 a very amazing car. My Taycan is very similar to yours as it has the sport design package matching mission E wheels and carbon on the mirrors. I now have about 5000 miles and it’s my go to daily driver. I have my dealer committed to ordering me a 992 GT3 manual as soon as they can take orders. In addition my F8 should be here in the next 45 days. Love cars and technology...a very bad habit indeed.
 

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That is a beautiful vehicle,
I also owned the Turbo S 911 a very amazing car. My Taycan is very similar to yours as it has the sport design package matching mission E wheels and carbon on the mirrors. I now have about 5000 miles and it’s my go to daily driver. I have my dealer committed to ordering me a 992 GT3 manual as soon as they can take orders. In addition my F8 should be here in the next 45 days. Love cars and technology...a very bad habit indeed.
That is a beautiful vehicle,
I also owned the Turbo S 911 a very amazing car. My Taycan is very similar to yours as it has the sport design package matching mission E wheels and carbon on the mirrors. I now have about 5000 miles and it’s my go to daily driver. I have my dealer committed to ordering me a 992 GT3 manual as soon as they can take orders. In addition my F8 should be here in the next 45 days. Love cars and technology...a very bad habit indeed.
A GT3 topped off with an F8... Almost too much to imagine. Exotics are thrilling, but finding a place to drive them is a job in itself, no? I am a partner in a Ford GT, and I had one very simulating drive through the canyon adjacent to where we live, but in the end our 911 Turbo S seemed to do all the same stuff with greater ease and so much more comfort.

I, too, am using the Taycan as my daily driver. I actually prefer it to the 911.

Your stable is memorable. Stay safe.
 

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With Tesla's rapid expansion I think it's safe to say they've moved past niche.

The idea that you'll see more Teslas on the road than Porsche to me doesn't mean that Tesla is the new Porsche. If anything more Teslas on the road will start to make them more bland like a Corolla or Camry.
 

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The only reason I switched from gas to electric is Porsche made the Taycan. Otherwise hell no.
 
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