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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Seen a lot of posts with people complaining about various issues regarding reliability, charging issues, Porsche/dealer support etc.

I’m just trying to get a feel for the percentage of people who feel like they made a good decision vs a bad decision in getting their car.

Given this is a fairly new car for Porsche, you would expect there to be some teething problems. I’m not sure at this point if I should be concerned with what I read on the forum or is it just an expected number of issues based on the number of people who hav me the car. I’m sure people are more likely to share a bad experience than if the car is performing as expected. Thank you!
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First of all welcome to the forum. Glad to have you here. Obviously there are Taycan owners having issues with their cars but there are also plenty who are not. I believe you are right in your assumption that the owners who are experiencing issues are much louder than those who are not. I've owned my 4S for almost two months and I had one minor issue. My Sirius XM radio would not load. A trip to the dealer and it was fixed. My software is up to date and I am not part of the power loss recall. Based on my more than a decade of experience with Porsche automobiles I feel confident they will step up a correct what ever teething issues are out there. I have no regrets with the purchase of my Taycan 4S.
 

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Very happy - now.

I had a few smaller glitches plus a bigger problem.
The latter Porsche needed two attempts to solve. They thought it was a SW problem the first time, but turned out that a small chip + magnetic valve were sporadic malfunctioning.
I acknowledge that it was a tough one, not really reproducible. Took them 12 days in total.

The SW glitches are mostly gone except sometimes the server is down, which leads to some smaller issues (easy to maneuver around, but they need to fix this soon).

What's really excellent is service (when car was in I always got very nice substitutes) plus the ride & HW is amazing!
 

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Glad that Porsche is addressing your issues and you are "Very happy-now"
 

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2021 Taycan RWD, Cherry Red Metallic
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I'm very happy, but the PCM has a lot of very serious bugs. Hoping they get resolved over time.
 

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There are definitely some gremlins in the PCM.
 
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Two months in on my Turbo S. A couple of thousand trouble free miles. Absolutely love it.
Best
Jan
 

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Two months in on my Turbo S. A couple of thousand trouble free miles. Absolutely love it.
Best
Jan
Glad to hear that.
 

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Its a great and fun car to drive. The PCM just seems like it they need some real software folks to think about it as a the major touch point to customers and that its not just the pedal/steering wheel while driving the car.

I heard from a mechanic that the service department always has problems getting up to speed with new models and this translates to some frustration for customers. They said it happened on all other new models when they release them.
 

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I worked for a major corporation which decided to completely change its operating systems. The IT folks worked on the new software for more than 3 years before we went live and when we did it was chaotic for more than a year. I guess Porsche is experiencing some of the same growing pains with the electronics in the Taycan. It will be interesting to see how well and how quickly they resolve some of these issues.
 

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I worked for a major corporation which decided to completely change its operating systems. The IT folks worked on the new software for more than 3 years before we went live and when we did it was chaotic for more than a year. I guess Porsche is experiencing some of the same growing pains with the electronics in the Taycan. It will be interesting to see how well and how quickly they resolve some of these issues.
my son is a tech engineer who's specialty is software conversions like you've mentioned,
he makes the conversions work, he designs the front and back ends for the projects he's worked on.
I have no clue as to the circumstances of your experience but I do know that it certainly is a long complex, complicated process and the steps taken can appear to be tiny ones, but each step of the processes that he's involved in are tested, retested, peer reviewed by a separate team then if deemed ready for release it is done in small doses.
I am far from qualified to comment on your experiences but from my perspective something must have gone extremely bad for such a cluster fugg to be part of the job.
all this points to is that porsche must have rushed their product to market without the proper testing.
case in point. OTA updates, currently the only updates distributed OTA are minor map updates. there have now been two instances where cars have been forced into the service centers for updates to be installed. this is not what was promised and sold.
 

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Its a great and fun car to drive. The PCM just seems like it they need some real software folks to think about it as a the major touch point to customers and that its not just the pedal/steering wheel while driving the car.

I heard from a mechanic that the service department always has problems getting up to speed with new models and this translates to some frustration for customers. They said it happened on all other new models when they release them.
this is beyond a wrench turner (no offense intended) learning the ins and outs of a new model, this is a whole new world for these guys. it is obvious that porsche did not train enough techs on the complex operating systems of the car.
 

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That would certainly seem to be the case.
 

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my son is a tech engineer who's specialty is software conversions like you've mentioned,
he makes the conversions work, he designs the front and back ends for the projects he's worked on.
I have no clue as to the circumstances of your experience but I do know that it certainly is a long complex, complicated process and the steps taken can appear to be tiny ones, but each step of the processes that he's involved in are tested, retested, peer reviewed by a separate team then if deemed ready for release it is done in small doses.
I am far from qualified to comment on your experiences but from my perspective something must have gone extremely bad for such a cluster fugg to be part of the job.
all this points to is that porsche must have rushed their product to market without the proper testing.
case in point. OTA updates, currently the only updates distributed OTA are minor map updates. there have now been two instances where cars have been forced into the service centers for updates to be installed. this is not what was promised and sold.
I do not own a Taycan but I am a software engineer with many years of experience. From the PC-DOS days to now. It's fairly obvious to me that testing the Taycan software was anything but easy and straightforward. The best people in the world to test those cars and their respective software would have been other IT people, not just auto-centric personnel. An IT engineer happens to be highly analytical and "knows" or can "guess" when something isn't working to spec. Obviously that wasn't a feasible testing approach from Porsche's perspective. Eventually all these bugs/glitches would be worked out. Another thing to keep in mind, is that Porsche sells cars all over the world with each locale requiring it's own version of the software which further complicates this entire picture.
 

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I do not own a Taycan but I am a software engineer with many years of experience. From the PC-DOS days to now. It's fairly obvious to me that testing the Taycan software was anything but easy and straightforward. The best people in the world to test those cars and their respective software would have been other IT people, not just auto-centric personnel. An IT engineer happens to be highly analytical and "knows" or can "guess" when something isn't working to spec. Obviously that wasn't a feasible testing approach from Porsche's perspective. Eventually all these bugs/glitches would be worked out. Another thing to keep in mind, is that Porsche sells cars all over the world with each locale requiring it's own version of the software which further complicates this entire picture.
all that is possibly true, however the car is extremely buggy.
Porsche seems to have outsourced it's IT work, and I am not going to delve deeper into where and who did the work but the work just isn't up to par. I'm curious as to how you formed the opinion that the best people in the world developed the software.

I owned an early tesla model S which had it's own set of issues but the software had nowhere near the many bugs that the porsche is having.
I don't want to claim that porsche rushed the car to market too quickly but it does seem that they attempted too much. even a 5% failure rate is unacceptable, cars dying on highways like some cars have is not a good thing.

as for eventually things will work out, that is just not acceptable, we were sold cars that are failing to perform as they are supposed to.
telling someone who's car has stopped running in the middle of a busy roadway that the software glitch that caused the failure will be addressed sometime in the future doesn't cut it.
this isn't some sort of logistical software that when it glitches causes issues that the techs can address at a later date, the software issues can be putting people in very dangerous situations.
 

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best people in the world developed the software
Please allow me to clarify. I said that the "best" or perhaps the "better" people to TEST (not developed) would be other IT software engineers. From what I am reading, it is rather obvious that the order of complexity in Porsche's software is high PLUS the dependency of the hardware itself (sensors, motors, etc.) not to fail or produce erroneous metrics/readings. It all boils down to quality control which apparently wasn't up to par. Then again to Porsche's defense, it can be argued that the car may have never made it to market if they had to spend another 5 years or so testing it. Technology moves fast and what's high tech today it could be "low" tech tomorrow. I know, not a comforting thought to the folk whose car stopped in the middle of the highway.
 
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