Taycan Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have now driven my 2020 Taycan 4S (big battery) for 2 years and I still have my 2013 Tesla Model S P85 which has 85,000 miles. I drive the Taycan in Normal mode mostly and the Tesla has only one mode. Whenever I drive the Tesla I am always amazed at the instant response from the touch of the accelerator compared to the Taycan. This changes somewhat when the Taycan is in Sport or Sport+; under those settings the Taycan responds close to the Tesla. So the difference is that the Tesla's normal mode (everyday driving, no turning dials) is equivalent to the Taycan's Sport and Sport+ off the line. Thus, to get the same kick as the Tesla, I need to run the Taycan in Sport or Sport+. It is unfortunate that Porsche configured the initial torque curve that way since the Tesla with all its initial torque, gives me the same mileage per kWh as the Taycan in normal mode. I am sure Porsche could correct this electronically. While I love all the other aspects of the Taycan, such as handling, maneuverability, fit and finish, looks, and sports car feel, I still get a better kick off the line in the Tesla. If you have a Taycan, and have never driven a Tesla, take a test ride and you will see what I mean. With enough of us describing the difference, perhaps they will tweak the electronics.
 

·
Registered
2021 taycan 4s
Joined
·
205 Posts
I suppose if getting off the line from red lights is crucial to your driving experience your assessment is valid however there is far more to driving than off the line acceleration and in many other aspects of driving the taycan is superior to a tesla. from highway cruising to running twisties to a far more luxurious cabin I think the taycan is an positive evolution of what tesla began
 

·
Registered
2022 Taycan RWD
Joined
·
33 Posts
Spoke to an early Tesla Salesman who said he made a lot of sales on the acceleration characterics of the model "S". He also said his boss was pissed at his premature wear of the tires. Seems he toasted a set in less than 4K miles. Many Tesla drivers have bitched about premature tire wear, so Tesla added "CHILL" mode to reduce the initial acceleration. I believe the Tesla feels like it accelerates faster due to the induction motor used in the model "S". The Taycan uses Permanent Magnet Motors which are more efficient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I suppose if getting off the line from red lights is crucial to your driving experience your assessment is valid however there is far more to driving than off the line acceleration and in many other aspects of driving the taycan is superior to a tesla. from highway cruising to running twisties to a far more luxurious cabin I think the taycan is an positive evolution of what tesla began
I agree with what you say, and I acknowledge that in my piece, that everything else in the Taycan is excellent. I am just stating the fact that there is a big difference at that period of time when driving these cars. If I had never driven a Tesla I would not have known the difference, but I do and people without that experience should be aware of this difference. We all like to be the first one out when the light changes, and doing it silently is the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
It's good as it is in the Taycan.
Reason being, my Tesla always runs in a quite short transmission (only one gear). This is good/ fast for low speeds and REALY BAD on the autobahn.
So, I can have all the best options (now driving sick passengers, smooth ride, or at the turn of a button brutal acceleration) plus excellent high-speed performance on the autobahn (>>80mph)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
I have now driven my 2020 Taycan 4S (big battery) for 2 years and I still have my 2013 Tesla Model S P85 which has 85,000 miles. I drive the Taycan in Normal mode mostly and the Tesla has only one mode. Whenever I drive the Tesla I am always amazed at the instant response from the touch of the accelerator compared to the Taycan. This changes somewhat when the Taycan is in Sport or Sport+; under those settings the Taycan responds close to the Tesla. So the difference is that the Tesla's normal mode (everyday driving, no turning dials) is equivalent to the Taycan's Sport and Sport+ off the line. Thus, to get the same kick as the Tesla, I need to run the Taycan in Sport or Sport+. It is unfortunate that Porsche configured the initial torque curve that way since the Tesla with all its initial torque, gives me the same mileage per kWh as the Taycan in normal mode. I am sure Porsche could correct this electronically. While I love all the other aspects of the Taycan, such as handling, maneuverability, fit and finish, looks, and sports car feel, I still get a better kick off the line in the Tesla. If you have a Taycan, and have never driven a Tesla, take a test ride and you will see what I mean. With enough of us describing the difference, perhaps they will tweak the electronics.
I am a bit confused. While we all wish that the Taycan would stay in the drive mode we last used rather than always revert to Normal, is it really that hard to reach down and tap the Sport button in order to get the snappy accelerator pedal response you prefer? I do not see any real difference in my miles/kWh in any of the modes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
The Taycan has a refined throttle tip in, that experience is what was desired. Many cars have an over aggressive reaction to the throttle input and that creates issues for controlled responses The throttle input should be linear and not an on off switch, Porsche creates sports cars not parlor tricks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I have now driven my 2020 Taycan 4S (big battery) for 2 years and I still have my 2013 Tesla Model S P85 which has 85,000 miles. I drive the Taycan in Normal mode mostly and the Tesla has only one mode. Whenever I drive the Tesla I am always amazed at the instant response from the touch of the accelerator compared to the Taycan. This changes somewhat when the Taycan is in Sport or Sport+; under those settings the Taycan responds close to the Tesla. So the difference is that the Tesla's normal mode (everyday driving, no turning dials) is equivalent to the Taycan's Sport and Sport+ off the line. Thus, to get the same kick as the Tesla, I need to run the Taycan in Sport or Sport+. It is unfortunate that Porsche configured the initial torque curve that way since the Tesla with all its initial torque, gives me the same mileage per kWh as the Taycan in normal mode. I am sure Porsche could correct this electronically. While I love all the other aspects of the Taycan, such as handling, maneuverability, fit and finish, looks, and sports car feel, I still get a better kick off the line in the Tesla. If you have a Taycan, and have never driven a Tesla, take a test ride and you will see what I mean. With enough of us describing the difference, perhaps they will tweak the electronics.
What is unreal to me is how good the Taycan is on Porsche’s first try out of the gate. I can’t imagine what they will be like after Porsche has thousands of these on the road with real world experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I have now driven my 2020 Taycan 4S (big battery) for 2 years and I still have my 2013 Tesla Model S P85 which has 85,000 miles. I drive the Taycan in Normal mode mostly and the Tesla has only one mode. Whenever I drive the Tesla I am always amazed at the instant response from the touch of the accelerator compared to the Taycan. This changes somewhat when the Taycan is in Sport or Sport+; under those settings the Taycan responds close to the Tesla. So the difference is that the Tesla's normal mode (everyday driving, no turning dials) is equivalent to the Taycan's Sport and Sport+ off the line. Thus, to get the same kick as the Tesla, I need to run the Taycan in Sport or Sport+. It is unfortunate that Porsche configured the initial torque curve that way since the Tesla with all its initial torque, gives me the same mileage per kWh as the Taycan in normal mode. I am sure Porsche could correct this electronically. While I love all the other aspects of the Taycan, such as handling, maneuverability, fit and finish, looks, and sports car feel, I still get a better kick off the line in the Tesla. If you have a Taycan, and have never driven a Tesla, take a test ride and you will see what I mean. With enough of us describing the difference, perhaps they will tweak the electronics.
Very true in your analysis between the two cars as I've had 4 Teslas prior to my Taycan. Personally though, I must say that I rarely punch the cars off the line anymore. It was novel at first for both my Teslas and Taycan. But after driving these cars for a month or so as my daily commute cars, I got to appreciate the aforementioned handling and build quality of the Porsche more and more. I miss the Tesla fart sounds once in a while when my kids are in the car and the software is much better in the Tesla, but what I appreciate most about the Taycan is that you don't see the streets filled with them as I do living in the Bay Area :)
 

·
Registered
2012 Cayenne S | 2020 Taycan Turbo
Joined
·
56 Posts
Very true in your analysis between the two cars as I've had 4 Teslas prior to my Taycan. Personally though, I must say that I rarely punch the cars off the line anymore. It was novel at first for both my Teslas and Taycan. But after driving these cars for a month or so as my daily commute cars, I got to appreciate the aforementioned handling and build quality of the Porsche more and more. I miss the Tesla fart sounds once in a while when my kids are in the car and the software is much better in the Tesla, but what I appreciate most about the Taycan is that you don't see the streets filled with them as I do living in the Bay Area :)
This thread is very interesting to me. I tried (TRIED REALLY HARD) to like the Tesla Model S over the Taycan (due to price) but after multiple test drives I had to conclude I must spend the price premium and buy a Taycan. I paid waaaaay more than what I would have spent on a Tesla Model S and I can tell you that it has been money very well spent as the Taycan is superior in every way except for 2 relatively unimportant ways - - 1. The Model S offers more rear passenger legroom (although the Taycan rear seating position is more comfortable IMHO) and 2. The Model S has more flexibility in the cargo aspect due to its hatchback design.

To me, the Taycan is well worth the price premium.

I think this acceleration debate in this thread is a little bit silly - - either vehicle has way more power and acceleration than anyone really needs. Once your zero to 60 time is below 4 seconds, does faster than that even matter???

Here’s a story that I thinks tells all. A friend of mine from the gym I workout at owns a Tesla Model 3 that his wife drives and she is very happy with it. He drives a Mercedes S Class. One day he tells me that he ordered a Tesla Model S Plaid and he then asks me “you drive a Porsche Taycan right?” I tell him “yes, a Taycan Turbo.” He then tells me that he’s thinking he maybe should have ordered a Taycan but his wife wanted him to get the Tesla.

I then asked him if he had test driven a Taycan before he ordered the Tesla Plaid. He said he had not done that. I then asked if he would like to test drive mine right now. He accepted and off we went to the parking lot.

I then had him drive to a perfect place for doing a Launch Control Demonstration in Sport + drive mode. I told him “Don’t slow down until you hit 88 miles an hour!” (Yes I’m a big fan of the Back to the Future movies.). He said you sure? I said “yes” and he said “Well OK!”

He then fully depresses the brake and then fully depresses the accelerator. He then releases the brake and off we go!!! He’s cursing with delight but eases off having reached only 82 mph.

I insist he’s got to do it again and not let up until we reach 88 mph. He does it again, curses in amazement again and goes all the way to 93 mph before he lets up.

He then slows way down and turns into the first place he can safely stop the car. He looks at me and says “you’ll have to drive us back. I can’t do this any more, I’m spent.” At first I thought he was kidding but he wasn’t. It turns out in less than 5 miles of driving he was totally spent both physically and emotionally.

So 3 months go by and I see my friend in the gym as I often do and he tells me his Tesla Plaid is in and he’s going to pick it up the next day. He then asks me if he could take another look at my Taycan - saying he doesn’t want to drive it, he only wants to sit in it. Of course I let him sit in it as long as he wanted and he thanked me and said “this car is f-ing gorgeous. I love the dashboard - it’s so classy and futuristic.”

So another week goes by and I see my friend in the gym. I ask him how he likes his Plaid. He then tells me how he went to pick it up, asked to look at it first and then he decided on the spot to forfeit his deposit and decline to take delivery of the car. He said to me “That car is too cheap looking and I don’t care it can go zero to 60 in 2 seconds. No way it’s worth 140 grand.”

I share this story to illustrate my point that once a car has a sub 4 second zero to 60 time, there’s lots of other factors (an important one of which is price) which impact what is the right car for each individual buyer. Since either a Tesla Model S or any Taycan that is a 4S or higher trim are wicked fast, it’s”silly” to be debating initial off the line acceleration.

My feelings are best described by paraphrasing The Most Interesting Man in the World - - “I don’t always drive really fast, but when I do,I prefer Porsche Taycan!”
 

·
Registered
2022 Taycan RWD
Joined
·
33 Posts
Had my RWD into the dealer for a software update. On the lot was a white Plaid. I walked up to it and it seemed like such a "Plain Jane" compared to any Porsche. Was tempted to ask for a spin around the block but on second though what was the point. The interior seems so void of any interesting visual points; And the Yoke steering wheel, if my wife had to take over the driving position I can't imagne the conversation.
Having said this, I'm all in on Tesla stock so I hope the populartiy continues as my portfolio has enabled me to own the Taycan.
 

·
Registered
2012 Cayenne S | 2020 Taycan Turbo
Joined
·
56 Posts
Had my RWD into the dealer for a software update. On the lot was a white Plaid. I walked up to it and it seemed like such a "Plain Jane" compared to any Porsche. Was tempted to ask for a spin around the block but on second though what was the point. The interior seems so void of any interesting visual points; And the Yoke steering wheel, if my wife had to take over the driving position I can't imagne the conversation.
Having said this, I'm all in on Tesla stock so I hope the populartiy continues as my portfolio has enabled me to own the Taycan.
If you’ve been holding Tesla stock for more than a year, I’d suggest you think hard about selling half of your holdings to get your initial investment back plus lock in a nice profit at the lower long term capital gains tax rate.

I think Tesla’s stock price will have a hard time reaching its previous all time high price and I think there’s risk that investors will drive the price down over the next 12 to 18 months.

Tesla has lots of headwinds to overcome Including supply chain issues and an ever growing number of quality new models from other automakers. In the U.S. many of these new models have the $7,500 Federal Tax Credit available which puts Tesla at a price disadvantage.

i think Tesla will certainly lose market share to these quality competitive offerings. One example is the Hyuandai IONIQ5 / Kia EV 6 which are outstanding vehicles and which are priced well below the Tesla Model Y after the $7,500 Tax Credit. Tesla will most certainly lose potential Model Y buyers to these two vehicles in the U.S. And this is but one example of how/why Tesla is certainly going to lose market share to several new EV’s coming into the market soon.

So, as an investor, how can Tesla continue to grow its sales? It CAN grow sales if overall growth in EV demand is greater than the rate at which Tesla loses market share. If that happens then Tesla sales can continue to grow and it’s stock price could climb higher.

Will that actually happen? I don't know so that’s why I suggest you should reduce your risk, take some profit and sell some of your Tesla stock holdings.
 

·
Registered
2022 Taycan RWD
Joined
·
33 Posts
If you’ve been holding Tesla stock for more than a year, I’d suggest you think hard about selling half of your holdings to get your initial investment back plus lock in a nice profit at the lower long term capital gains tax rate.

I think Tesla’s stock price will have a hard time reaching its previous all time high price and I think there’s risk that investors will drive the price down over the next 12 to 18 months.

Tesla has lots of headwinds to overcome Including supply chain issues and an ever growing number of quality new models from other automakers. In the U.S. many of these new models have the $7,500 Federal Tax Credit available which puts Tesla at a price disadvantage.

i think Tesla will certainly lose market share to these quality competitive offerings. One example is the Hyuandai IONIQ5 / Kia EV 6 which are outstanding vehicles and which are priced well below the Tesla Model Y after the $7,500 Tax Credit. Tesla will most certainly lose potential Model Y buyers to these two vehicles in the U.S. And this is but one example of how/why Tesla is certainly going to lose market share to several new EV’s coming into the market soon.

So, as an investor, how can Tesla continue to grow its sales? It CAN grow sales if overall growth in EV demand is greater than the rate at which Tesla loses market share. If that happens then Tesla sales can continue to grow and it’s stock price could climb higher.

Will that actually happen? I don't know so that’s why I suggest you should reduce your risk, take some profit and sell some of your Tesla stock holdings.
Thanks for the thoughtful advice, I do have a bail-out price target in mind. With the stock split and two factories opening up and huge order book there would seem to be a strong possibility of increased stock value. High gas prices have sparked additional interest in EVs and no one has inventory on the lots. Let’s leave it at that for the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
If you’ve been holding Tesla stock for more than a year, I’d suggest you think hard about selling half of your holdings to get your initial investment back plus lock in a nice profit at the lower long term capital gains tax rate.

I think Tesla’s stock price will have a hard time reaching its previous all time high price and I think there’s risk that investors will drive the price down over the next 12 to 18 months.
If I was giving advice it would be to buy more stock. Tesla's factory in China is just getting rolling and sales in the country will outstrip all other markets in the next few years, regardless of competitive models.
 

·
Registered
2012 Cayenne S | 2020 Taycan Turbo
Joined
·
56 Posts
If I was giving advice it would be to buy more stock. Tesla's factory in China is just getting rolling and sales in the country will outstrip all other markets in the next few years, regardless of competitive models.
Isn’t it interesting how this thread has changed from off the line acceleration to ideas about investing in Tesla stock??
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top