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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Looks like there will be a new insurance option coming soon for Taycans and other Porsches. Porsche will offer a "per-mile" insurance program for owners in Oregon, Illinois, and possibly a third state by the end of the year. I assume expansion will hinge on how it goes these states first.

According to a press release from Porsche, the insurance program is available for vehicles from 1981 to the present:
The Porsche insurance program, administered in partnership with Mile Auto and Porsche Financial Services, doesn’t involve the collection of the vehicle’s location, or when and how it’s driven. Mile Auto’s solution simply involves submitting a photo of the vehicle odometer at regular intervals.

“No other information is collected from the vehicle or customer,” Porsche Financial Services assured Green Car Reports.

Although the timing of the program is perfect for those electric-vehicle concerns, Porsche says that the program was developed independent of the Taycan launch. It will cover the Taycan as well as every Porsche model going back to the 1981 model year.
If this expands to more than 2-3 states, this could be a great option for insuring the Taycan, especially if you don't plan on driving it regularly.
 

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I have been looking forward to insurance based on mileage for some time as I have my higher end cars for weekend fun driving and do not stack up many miles per year.
 

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I have been looking forward to insurance based on mileage for some time as I have my higher end cars for weekend fun driving and do not stack up many miles per year.
Hopefully Porsche makes the insurance program available in Texas for you MPawelek!
 

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This is interesting, Tesla is now introducing its own insurance program for its customers. They're claiming it can offer people up to 20-30% lower rates (which I have to see to believe).


Late Wednesday, Tesla seemingly gave Tesla owners and intenders what they’ve been looking for: an opportunity to lower their insurance premiums. For a number of reasons, mainly high claim frequencies and the cost thereof, Tesla owners often find themselves saddled with sky-high coverage costs.

What if Tesla provided that insurance?

Owners will soon find out the pros and cons of such a setup, as Tesla has now rolled out its promised Tesla Insurance — a product the automaker claims will benefit owners by offering “up to 20% lower rates, and in some cases as much as 30%.”

With coverage offered initially to California residents (no word on when other states come onboard), the Tesla Insurance website went live last night, then promptly went blank. It currently reads “Algorithm update in progress.”

Tesla CEO Elon Musk first floated the concept of Tesla Insurance back in April, with some questioning how the automaker could afford the offering given the price it charges insurance companies for replacement parts.

“Because Tesla knows its vehicles best, Tesla Insurance is able to leverage the advanced technology, safety, and serviceability of our cars to provide insurance at a lower cost,” the automaker wrote in a blog post. “This pricing reflects the benefits of Tesla’s active safety and advanced driver assistance features that come standard on all new Tesla vehicles.”

Not long ago, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety declared the Tesla Model 3 to be the most expensive 2018 model-year vehicle to insure in the United States. A year earlier, AAA-The Auto Club Group, citing claims data from the Highway Loss Data Institute, said premiums for Tesla vehicles should go up to the tune of 30 percent. French insurer AXA recently claimed electric luxury vehicles are 40 percent more likely to be involved in an accident.

Certainly, Tesla likes to tout its vehicle’s fleet-footedness, and videos continue to appear online of Tesla owners dangerously misusing their vehicle’s semi-autonomous Autopilot feature. Snoozing behind the wheel usually doesn’t lead to lower premiums.

Initially, Tesla might realize a windfall from this gambit, but one wonders what will happen when the unprofitable company has to pay out.
 
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