Porsche Taycan EV Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

Porsche Taycan GT3
(Shown In Guards Red)


Well, no. This isn't the Porsche Taycan GT3, but maybe it could be.

Our artist's rendering showcases what could happen if the sports car experts at Porsche turned their race car-focus to the brand's upcoming Tesla killer.

Porsche has given no indication that a GT3 model could ever exist, but it makes sense considering the brand's long-term commitment and heritage in motorsports. Plus, with news that Porsche is going to adapt it's current badging system to the Taycan, if there's going to be a Taycan Turbo (without a turbo of course) then there very well could be a Taycan GT3.

Drawing inspiration from the current 911 GT3, a Taycan GT3 would likely get active aerodynamics, including a massive race-inspired rear spoiler. Also look for center lock wheels and a wider stance with custom aero enhancements.

Inside we'd expect some stripped-down components and light-weight carbon fiber bucket seats.

Powering this electric race car for the street would be an up-rated version of the standard motor with north of 650-hp, allowing for a 0-60 time of well-under 3 seconds. Stats aside, the goal, as with all GT3 models, would be true driving enjoyment and an unparalleled connection to the road - helping set the Taycan apart further from its rivals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
This makes absolutely no sense but its cool, i'll give you guys that. Porsche already mentioned the highest performing version would be called a 'Turbo' which is closer to all the other higher trim Porsche sold today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
That is a fantastic rendering, and the GT3 guise suits the Taycan quite well. I know the Electric GT was able to reduce the P100D's weight by 1,100lbs with biocomposites. 20% cut in weight would yield huge improvements to performance on this platform.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
312 Posts


This is amazing. I think 20% cut in weight is unrealistic, but if they could drop 100 lbs that would be big. Weight is the enemy of EVs, so every pound counts here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
With a hybrid version of the 911 coming in a couple years, there is no knowing how else Porsche plans on expanding upon their electrified models. Think purists will take issue with a GT3 that isn't powered by a flat six?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
If they are upset over the redesigned rear end and taillight, then I'm sure they are already up in arms about electrification. To be honest judgment should be reserved until you've actually had the opportunity to experience the new configuration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
With a hybrid version of the 911 coming in a couple years, there is no knowing how else Porsche plans on expanding upon their electrified models. Think purists will take issue with a GT3 that isn't powered by a flat six?
Purist or not, anyone with half a brain knows the Taycan would never get a GT3 trim, it goes completely against what GT3 even stands for. This whole rendering was pointless and came after Porsche announced what a high performing Taycan would be called.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
So now that the Taycan has been revealed in full production form with confirmed model names, future models that slot between these launch versions and a "Taycan GT3" should be considered. After all, they are FAR more likely to happen well ahead of a GT3 tier Taycan.

Basing potential model names off the Panamera is a start, as this one publication outlined:

The future of Porsche Taycan: Here’s what’s coming next
The 2020 Porsche Taycan Turbo and Turbo S were just revealed, and while they look damn impressive on paper – all-wheel drive, twin motors, and the Turbo S can send up to 750 horsepower to the wheels in “overboost” mode – but we’re already thinking about what’s on the horizon. That’s because Porsche has provided us with strong hints that there are other Taycan variants coming. This is no surprise, because look at the gradients in other Porsche models like the 911 – from the base Carrera to the wild GT2, there are many flavors of speed.

The best analogue for the Taycan’s future is the Panamera, and that comes straight from the mouth of a Porsche representative to our man attending the reveal event. There won’t be a 1:1 relationship between variants – after all, a “Turbo” EV is already incoherent nomenclature, and a Taycan E-Hybrid would be a bridge too far even for Porsche. But we can expect a loose relationship. As a reminder, the Panamera model walk is as follows:
  • Panamera
  • Panamera 4
  • Panamera 4 Sport Turismo
  • Panamera 4 Executive (long-wheelbase)
  • Panamera 4S
  • Panamera 4S Sport Turismo
  • Panamera 4S Executive
  • Panamera GTS
  • Panamera GTS Sport Turismo
  • Panamera Turbo
  • Panamera Turbo Sport Turismo
  • Panamera Turbo Executive
  • Panamera 4 E-Hybrid
  • Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
  • Panamera 4 E-Hybrid Executive
  • Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid
  • Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Executive
  • Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo
Did you remember offhand that there were so many Panamera variants? There are a lot. And you get the gist of the progression, and the different body styles.

One thing we know for sure is that there will be a Taycan Cross Turismo – that’s a variation on Sport Turismo, Porschesprechen for wagon – variant. It’s confirmed for production, and also for the U.S., Porsche reps tell us. And we also know that Porsche is already concerned it won’t be very successful in North America. Porsche’s North American CEO, Klaus Zellmer, told our West Coast Editor James Riswick that in the U.S., the Sport Turismo makes up about 10% of Panamera sales. American buyers view it as sitting below the regular Panamera sedans, in stark contrast to Europe where the Sport Turismo represents half of sales. We think a Taycan Cross Turismo will be a niche model, and perhaps not offered in every powertrain variant.

Which variants below the Turbo and Turbo S will be sold? A GTS seems likely as a special model with a performance orientation, offering desirable extra equipment as standard but with lower output than the Turbo. It’s a standard across all Porsche model lines historically, although the Macan and Cayenne aren’t currently offered as such but have been in the past and may again be in the future. An offering below GTS would make sense, too. We’re hearing the possibility of a rear-drive, single-motor base model, although we haven’t been able to pin Porsche down on this beyond the general relationship between Panamera and Taycan offerings.

But others have heard hints that this will be the case. Alex Roy heard late last year from a Porsche Global Brand Ambassador that a base Taycan, a 4S and Turbo will be sold, although this didn’t predict the Turbo S. And way back in late 2017, Georg Kacher at Automobile, who is generally well-sourced, heard that there will be three powertrain variants at roughly 400, 536 and 670 horsepower, and a rear-drive model might be considered after launch. Again, this didn’t predict the Turbo S, which may not have been finalized when these conversations were happening. But they both point to Porsche considering a lower-powered model. The base Panamera makes 330 horsepower, and so 400 sounds about right for the base Taycan.

What we can say is this: There’s a $65,800 spread between a base Panamera ($87,200) and a Panamera Turbo ($153,000 non-hybrid). If we apply that rough math to the Taycan Turbo, which closely matches the Panamera Turbo’s price at $153,510, we are hoping that a base rear-drive Taycan could hit the market at around $90,000.

The caveat being that there’s no guarantee that Porsche will offer a Taycan at such a low spec. Zellmer told Riswick that the Taycan rides on a “very expensive platform” – essentially “spaceship technology,” to use his hyperbolic wording – and it’ll be exclusive to high-end Taycan and Audi E-Tron models. Whether you read that as Zellmer saying that there won’t be a model below the Taycan using this platform, or that they won’t offer base trims, is open to interpretation.

At a minimum, we’re excited to see how the Taycan’s sleek styling works in production wagon guise. The spy shots look exceptionally promising. Until then, the Taycan configurator is live on Porsche’s site, if you want to spec your own Turbo or Turbo S out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Just found my new favorite rendering of what a Taycan GT3 RS model could look like. Whoever created this should take it a step further and render a Taycan GT2 RS.

596
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Regarding range and weight, I asked if it was possible to upgrade the car with lighter and more performing batteries at a later stage and they said that battery packs were only to be replaced in case of defect but with similar weight... if not they would have to go through a full re-homologation process
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top