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As the September launch of the Porsche Taycan approaches, Porsche has announced the car is now in its final phase of pre-production testing.

Of note:
The car has been tested in 30 countries
Tested from -30 to +50 degrees C
Tested from 85 meters below sea level to 3,000 meters above
Over 100,000 charing cycles
Over 1,000 different drivers
6 million km of test driving
Targeted sub-8 minute Nurburgring lap time



PRESS RELEASE


Testing of the new Porsche Taycan has entered the final stage

Stuttgart. Porsche’s first purely electrically driven sports car, the Taycan, is currently completing its final test drives before it enters series production. In Scandinavia, just a few kilometres away from the Arctic Circle, it is proving its potential in terms of driving dynamics on snow and ice. At the same time, Porsche engineers are taking advantage of the summer in the Southern Hemisphere. In South Africa, they are conducting performance tests, as well as final adjustments in terms of continuous performance and reproducibility. In Dubai they are carrying out hot-climate endurance runs and testing battery charging under extreme conditions. The 30 countries across the globe in which these comprehensive tests are being carried out have temperatures that range from minus 35 to plus 50 degree Celsius.

“After carrying out computer simulations and comprehensive bench tests early on, we have now reached the final phase of this demanding testing programme,” underlines the vice president of the model line, Stefan Weckbach: “Before the Taycan is launched on the market at the end of the year, we will have covered approximately six million kilometres across the globe. We are already very happy with the current status of the vehicles. The Taycan is going to be a true Porsche.”

Of course, at Porsche, electric cars have to undergo the same rigorous testing programme as sport cars with combustion engines. In addition to displaying superior performance, this always includes proving unrestricted suitability for everyday use in all climate conditions. Particularly demanding features such as charging the battery or temperature control of the drive train and the interior under extreme conditions are additional aspects in the battery-powered models. Other typical Porsche development targets include circuit performance, multiple accelerations, as well as a range suitable for everyday use.

The most significant facts from the Taycan testing phase:
Overall distance covered: Approximately six million kilometres, of which two million were endurance run kilometres
Countries: A total of 30, including the USA, China, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Finland
Temperatures: From minus 35 to plus 50 degree Celsius
Air humidity: From 20 to 100 per cent
Altitude: From 85 metres below to 3,000 metres above sea level
Charging cycles: Over 100,000 using various charging technologies across the globe
Development team: Around 1,000 test drivers, technicians and engineers


Virtual drive through “The Green ****”
Test experts were able to build upon the comprehensive findings from the digital testing stage using digital prototypes. At present, computers are used to design the body, drive, chassis, electronics and overall vehicle of a new model and to simulate their functions – which includes how they work together. In total, the virtual prototypes of the Taycan have completed more than ten million digital kilometres.

This meant that development engineers started driving a Taycan around the Nürburgring Nordschleife in a driving simulator at an early stage, so that they could test and evaluate its circuit performance. During this process, they focused on the electrical energy management, which plays an important role in achieving a sub-eight-minute lap time on the 20.6-kilometre (timed distance) Nordschleife. Already more than 20,000 prospective buyers The Porsche Taycan will be introduced in September and will be launched onto the market at the end of the year. Across the globe, there are already more than 20,000 serious prospective buyers. The potential customers have put their names down on an option programme list and made a down payment.

The Taycan accelerates from zero to 100 km/h in significantly less than 3.5 seconds. It has a range of more than 500 kilometres (according to the NEDC). The 800-V architecture in the vehicle guarantees that the lithium-ion battery can be recharged in just four minutes, providing enough energy to drive 100 kilometres (according to NEDC).





 

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One downside is, even with all the testing done, come time for production models to be put through their paces, the perception of how reliable/durable it is can fall apart.
This is due to many factors that take place on any mass production format, if it performs well in the first 6 months, then we have a solid product.
 

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The main area of concern, for me at least is battery degradation. Many of these newer performance EV's are using leading edge charging technology, bringing some of the fastest recharge rates we've seen in a production electric. Surely issues would have occurred during the 100k test cycles however.
 

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I don't see how "all the testing" is a downside? People were worried about battery degradation when the Prius came out, then worried about it when the Tesla came out, both turned out to be non issues. Warranty will cover any issues you run into and by the time the warranty runs out, you would have moved onto something newer and better.
 

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I don't know if you can say its a non issue, as there have been many reports from Model 3 owners claiming a 33% range loss in colder conditions. In even more extremes this has been found to go upwards of 45%. This is a given with EV's, so just plan accordingly.
 

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Degradation is permanent capacity loss, I don't see that as an issue with the battery management tech that's being put into the packs these days. Cold temp loss is not the same, and is unavoidable with current battery chemistry. If you are in very cold weather I would expect 40-50% range loss in the real world. Porsche is not going to have a magical solution to this.
 

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Degradation is permanent capacity loss, I don't see that as an issue with the battery management tech that's being put into the packs these days. Cold temp loss is not the same, and is unavoidable with current battery chemistry. If you are in very cold weather I would expect 40-50% range loss in the real world. Porsche is not going to have a magical solution to this.
Degredation is a real issue. Or even just the temporary inconvenience. A friend of mine with a LEAF says the battery overheats when he uses a fast charger, and that's nothing like the 800-volt solution Porsche is planning.
 

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I guess that somewhat explains the rush to get chargers out in mass numbers and quick. Most EV drivers I know charge at home and see no need to charge on the go. With degradation I can see that gap closing up but once that happens chargers should be easy and convenient to find.
 

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LOL the Leaf's battery doesn't have thermal management, so of course it overheats when fast charging. Nissan intentionally did this to save money. The batteries in the Leaf degrades drastically after a few years and is well knows for that. You can't compare them to cars with a proper battery management system, i.e Tesla, Porsche, Audi, etc.
 

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LOL the Leaf's battery doesn't have thermal management, so of course it overheats when fast charging. Nissan intentionally did this to save money. The batteries in the Leaf degrades drastically after a few years and is well knows for that. You can't compare them to cars with a proper battery management system, i.e Tesla, Porsche, Audi, etc.
It gets scary when you look at the consequences of fast charging all the time, an obvious one too, it means replacing components much sooner.

Apparently it can result in a battery life span of just 2 darn years!
 

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LOL the Leaf's battery doesn't have thermal management, so of course it overheats when fast charging. Nissan intentionally did this to save money. The batteries in the Leaf degrades drastically after a few years and is well knows for that. You can't compare them to cars with a proper battery management system, i.e Tesla, Porsche, Audi, etc.


Sounds like the LEAF is just asking for trouble then.
 

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Are the doors going to opening from inside out like shown on Mission E video , or as a regular 4 door sedan?
The latest spy photos reveal that it will have conventional doors, not the "suicide" doors like the concept. Too bad, but that just didn't seem likely.
 

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I guess that somewhat explains the rush to get chargers out in mass numbers and quick. Most EV drivers I know charge at home and see no need to charge on the go. With degradation I can see that gap closing up but once that happens chargers should be easy and convenient to find.
"Taycan will use the SAE type of plug, so other public stations with that connection will be accessible, just not for free."
This is key. US and EU manufacturers are using the standard plug that has been adopted in the USA. Japanese automakers are still using the Japanese standard plug and Tesla uses it's own proprietary plug.
If you don't want to build out your own national charging network it makes sense to use the standard plug.
 
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