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I'm sure that my brief summary below from having now driven all 4 Taycan models will draw a spectrum of opinions, but here is my personal summary of all 4 outstanding Taycans, each with different DNA.

One very very important note is that the 3 lower models were not spec'd with RAS, which is absolutely mandatory in my opinion when ordering a Taycan. RAS is standard only on the Turbo S. For handling purposes, PDCC is also a great option for the heaviest Turbo/S models.

1. RWD-
If you are looking for the best handling Taycan, then hands down, this is the one to get. Must spec with RAS as mandatory for more the most nimble, crisp handling. I drove the 180 pounds lower weight RWD with the 160 pound lightet standard battery, and this lighter weight coupled with no extra weight in the front for the 2nd engine gives this car the clear advantage as the best handling Taycan in the range.

The downside of the RWD Taycan Is the more subdued performance. Since there are no official 0 to 60 Figures on the car in real world driving, I would estimate that it is about a 4.8 second car to 60. Brisk, but certainly not fast acceleration like the other 3 models to come....

2. 4S.
Arguably I would say that this could be the sweet spot in the Taycan range, as it packs much faster performance than the RWD. Having owned a 991.2 C2S, I Would say that this car is a 3.3 second 0-60 that felt almost as fast as my C2S.

Prior to having driven the RWD, I would say that the 4S was the all out handling winner. But the weight savings that only the RWD offers, especially with no front engine weight and the lighter base battery weight (which the dealer I drove this car at spec'd all of their RWD 's with the base battery) that I drove again makes the RWD the clear handling victor in the range.

3. Turbo and Turbo S
I'm grouping both of these models in the same opinion category, because the performance and handling characteristics are so similar and are very distant from both the RWD and 4S.

I need to preface my opinions of both the Turbo and Turbo S Models with the following caution: Both of these models should really be considered like the 911GT cars as they are best suited for track use, and can get one in very dangerous "arrest me" speeds or killed if a very very experienced driver is not at the wheel. The speed is really that dangerous if the driver wants to extract maximum acceleration performance.

Both of these cars are brilliant at neck snapping acceleration. However, the trade off, especially as I noticed on the Turbo S at 5,250 LBS ( nearly 800 lbs heavier than the RWD with base battery), is that both of these cars do not have the same handling characteristics as the RWD, and 4S. Even with PDCC, which was spec'd on the Turbo S which I drove,, the handling while much flatter in the curves, has much more noticeable body roll, which the laws of physics of extra weight can't deny. Still, given the extra weight of the Turbo/S, both of these cars handle with wizardry given weights that are @2,000 lbs heavier than the 911 !!!

I did not factor in the price differences in any of the 4 Taycan models, because they are all very premiumly priced as compared to any other EV car maker, save Fisker or Lucid...

There were also several other subtle differences between each of these 4 models, But I have simply highlighted what I think are the most standout differences between what are without question the best build quality, EV cars on the road. Period.

I decided on the RWD with the base battery with RAS, PASM (standard on the other 3 models), sport chrono, 20" Turbo wheels...Having just sold my C2S, the hyper speed of the other models, while amazing, will not be of use, unless one picks their car up in Germany and drives on the A8 ( much fun!!) up and down to Austria and Italy over to Stelvio Pass and back...

JB
 

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I'm sure that my brief summary below from having now driven all 4 Taycan models will draw a spectrum of opinions, but here is my personal summary of all 4 outstanding Taycans, each with different DNA.

One very very important note is that the 3 lower models were not spec'd with RAS, which is absolutely mandatory in my opinion when ordering a Taycan. RAS is standard only on the Turbo S. For handling purposes, PDCC is also a great option for the heaviest Turbo/S models.

1. RWD-
If you are looking for the best handling Taycan, then hands down, this is the one to get. Must spec with RAS as mandatory for more the most nimble, crisp handling. I drove the 180 pounds lower weight RWD with the 160 pound lightet standard battery, and this lighter weight coupled with no extra weight in the front for the 2nd engine gives this car the clear advantage as the best handling Taycan in the range.

The downside of the RWD Taycan Is the more subdued performance. Since there are no official 0 to 60 Figures on the car in real world driving, I would estimate that it is about a 4.8 second car to 60. Brisk, but certainly not fast acceleration like the other 3 models to come....

2. 4S.
Arguably I would say that this could be the sweet spot in the Taycan range, as it packs much faster performance than the RWD. Having owned a 991.2 C2S, I Would say that this car is a 3.3 second 0-60 that felt almost as fast as my C2S.

Prior to having driven the RWD, I would say that the 4S was the all out handling winner. But the weight savings that only the RWD offers, especially with no front engine weight and the lighter base battery weight (which the dealer I drove this car at spec'd all of their RWD 's with the base battery) that I drove again makes the RWD the clear handling victor in the range.

3. Turbo and Turbo S
I'm grouping both of these models in the same opinion category, because the performance and handling characteristics are so similar and are very distant from both the RWD and 4S.

I need to preface my opinions of both the Turbo and Turbo S Models with the following caution: Both of these models should really be considered like the 911GT cars as they are best suited for track use, and can get one in very dangerous "arrest me" speeds or killed if a very very experienced driver is not at the wheel. The speed is really that dangerous if the driver wants to extract maximum acceleration performance.

Both of these cars are brilliant at neck snapping acceleration. However, the trade off, especially as I noticed on the Turbo S at 5,250 LBS ( nearly 800 lbs heavier than the RWD with base battery), is that both of these cars do not have the same handling characteristics as the RWD, and 4S. Even with PDCC, which was spec'd on the Turbo S which I drove,, the handling while much flatter in the curves, has much more noticeable body roll, which the laws of physics of extra weight can't deny. Still, given the extra weight of the Turbo/S, both of these cars handle with wizardry given weights that are @2,000 lbs heavier than the 911 !!!

I did not factor in the price differences in any of the 4 Taycan models, because they are all very premiumly priced as compared to any other EV car maker, save Fisker or Lucid...

There were also several other subtle differences between each of these 4 models, But I have simply highlighted what I think are the most standout differences between what are without question the best build quality, EV cars on the road. Period.

I decided on the RWD with the base battery with RAS, PASM (standard on the other 3 models), sport chrono, 20" Turbo wheels...Having just sold my C2S, the hyper speed of the other models, while amazing, will not be of use, unless one picks their car up in Germany and drives on the A8 ( much fun!!) up and down to Austria and Italy over to Stelvio Pass and back...

JB
GREAT SUMMARY - many thanks, JB ! I have the 4S with all options n drive it between Switzerland and Tuscany regularly (the Passo della Cisa and the stretch around Livorno, being a bridge, let’s you max it out.... while the Maloja pass below St Moritz is also made for the car....)
 
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