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I have a 2013 Model S P85 (top of the line for that year) and have driven it almost daily for over 5 years and 70,000 miles. I have had a deposit on the Taycan for over a year now (one of the first), wanting to try something new in electric. I also have a Cayenne and a vintage 944, so I am familiar with Porsche engineering. I took my first test drive in a Taycan Turbo today and this is my first impression compared to my early Tesla model S.

The first thing that strikes you once you have adjusted your seat and look out the windshield is that this is a Porsche and a sports car with the front fenders rising on either side. The Tesla is a fast sedan, but does not have the same sports car feel like the Taycan.

In the Tesla, once you enter the car you touch the brake and the car comes alive, in the Taycan you need to put your foot on the brake and press START on the left of the steering wheel for the car to come alive. Then and only then does the Taycan’s beautiful dash appear, otherwise, with an all-black interior, all you see is black.

Once you start driving you notice something that Tesla owners don’t have – a whining sound at all speeds, even with the optional motor sound feature turned off. This is a bit annoying since I am used to complete silence. Other than that, the handling was all Porsche, very tight and exacting. However, traveling at 55 and hitting the accelerator, in the Telsa you get instant torque with no hesitation, but after several of these in the Taycan, there was a distinctive slight hesitation before it lunges forward. I have never noticed this type of hesitation in my Tesla.

There is a setting for regenerative breaking that when set does give some breaking when you lift your foot off the accelerator. It is not as dramatic as the Tesla, but better than nothing. You might be able to do some one peddle driving in certain situations.

I should say a word about range. The car was unplugged when I took the drive and it had 201 miles on the battery (as the suggested range by the EPA) and 328 miles on the odometer. I drove some mixed driving for 8 miles on the odometer but when we arrived back at the dealer, the battery had 199 miles on it. This is good and better power regeneration than I see on my Tesla, so the 201-mile range could be significantly higher than expected, a pleasant surprise, since 201-mile range is not good for my type of driving.

A word about the outside. It is a shame that the front camera and sensors are located just below the nose. For this reason it places the license plate on the tip of the nose spoiling the look of the front, in those states that require front license plates, very annoying. If the cameras and sensors were offset a bit, the plate could go in the space below the nose.

Leaving the car: In the Tesla, when you stop and ready to leave, you press the button on the shift stick and leave. In the Taycan, you need to push “P” for park located on the right of the shifter, then go to the left side of the steering wheel and turn the car off – Ugh.

I was ready to order if the car blew me away, but it didn’t. The slight hesitation, the whine in the motors, and other things (particularly range) dampened my enthusiasm. So, I think I will wait a while to see what happens and read more reviews from other owners.
 

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I have a 2013 Model S P85 (top of the line for that year) and have driven it almost daily for over 5 years and 70,000 miles. I have had a deposit on the Taycan for over a year now (one of the first), wanting to try something new in electric. I also have a Cayenne and a vintage 944, so I am familiar with Porsche engineering. I took my first test drive in a Taycan Turbo today and this is my first impression compared to my early Tesla model S.

The first thing that strikes you once you have adjusted your seat and look out the windshield is that this is a Porsche and a sports car with the front fenders rising on either side. The Tesla is a fast sedan, but does not have the same sports car feel like the Taycan.

In the Tesla, once you enter the car you touch the brake and the car comes alive, in the Taycan you need to put your foot on the brake and press START on the left of the steering wheel for the car to come alive. Then and only then does the Taycan’s beautiful dash appear, otherwise, with an all-black interior, all you see is black.

Once you start driving you notice something that Tesla owners don’t have – a whining sound at all speeds, even with the optional motor sound feature turned off. This is a bit annoying since I am used to complete silence. Other than that, the handling was all Porsche, very tight and exacting. However, traveling at 55 and hitting the accelerator, in the Telsa you get instant torque with no hesitation, but after several of these in the Taycan, there was a distinctive slight hesitation before it lunges forward. I have never noticed this type of hesitation in my Tesla.

There is a setting for regenerative breaking that when set does give some breaking when you lift your foot off the accelerator. It is not as dramatic as the Tesla, but better than nothing. You might be able to do some one peddle driving in certain situations.

I should say a word about range. The car was unplugged when I took the drive and it had 201 miles on the battery (as the suggested range by the EPA) and 328 miles on the odometer. I drove some mixed driving for 8 miles on the odometer but when we arrived back at the dealer, the battery had 199 miles on it. This is good and better power regeneration than I see on my Tesla, so the 201-mile range could be significantly higher than expected, a pleasant surprise, since 201-mile range is not good for my type of driving.

A word about the outside. It is a shame that the front camera and sensors are located just below the nose. For this reason it places the license plate on the tip of the nose spoiling the look of the front, in those states that require front license plates, very annoying. If the cameras and sensors were offset a bit, the plate could go in the space below the nose.

Leaving the car: In the Tesla, when you stop and ready to leave, you press the button on the shift stick and leave. In the Taycan, you need to push “P” for park located on the right of the shifter, then go to the left side of the steering wheel and turn the car off – Ugh.

I was ready to order if the car blew me away, but it didn’t. The slight hesitation, the whine in the motors, and other things (particularly range) dampened my enthusiasm. So, I think I will wait a while to see what happens and read more reviews from other owners.
thanks for the cool write-up.. what Taycan trim level did you test drive? Mine was a Turbo and it had 255mi at 99% SoC
 

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As I mentioned it was the Turbo. Fully charged the battery had 201 miles on it.
 

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Mine said the same 99% but 201 miles. What update? They said that Porsche was going to "open" the restrictions on the battery like Tesla. That 99% is for the blocked battery not the complete battery potential. If it is 255, that would be a game changer for me. That is the total of my Tesla and 90% is 230.
 

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I have a 2013 Model S P85 (top of the line for that year) and have driven it almost daily for over 5 years and 70,000 miles. I have had a deposit on the Taycan for over a year now (one of the first), wanting to try something new in electric. I also have a Cayenne and a vintage 944, so I am familiar with Porsche engineering. I took my first test drive in a Taycan Turbo today and this is my first impression compared to my early Tesla model S.

The first thing that strikes you once you have adjusted your seat and look out the windshield is that this is a Porsche and a sports car with the front fenders rising on either side. The Tesla is a fast sedan, but does not have the same sports car feel like the Taycan.

In the Tesla, once you enter the car you touch the brake and the car comes alive, in the Taycan you need to put your foot on the brake and press START on the left of the steering wheel for the car to come alive. Then and only then does the Taycan’s beautiful dash appear, otherwise, with an all-black interior, all you see is black.

Once you start driving you notice something that Tesla owners don’t have – a whining sound at all speeds, even with the optional motor sound feature turned off. This is a bit annoying since I am used to complete silence. Other than that, the handling was all Porsche, very tight and exacting. However, traveling at 55 and hitting the accelerator, in the Telsa you get instant torque with no hesitation, but after several of these in the Taycan, there was a distinctive slight hesitation before it lunges forward. I have never noticed this type of hesitation in my Tesla.

There is a setting for regenerative breaking that when set does give some breaking when you lift your foot off the accelerator. It is not as dramatic as the Tesla, but better than nothing. You might be able to do some one peddle driving in certain situations.

I should say a word about range. The car was unplugged when I took the drive and it had 201 miles on the battery (as the suggested range by the EPA) and 328 miles on the odometer. I drove some mixed driving for 8 miles on the odometer but when we arrived back at the dealer, the battery had 199 miles on it. This is good and better power regeneration than I see on my Tesla, so the 201-mile range could be significantly higher than expected, a pleasant surprise, since 201-mile range is not good for my type of driving.

A word about the outside. It is a shame that the front camera and sensors are located just below the nose. For this reason it places the license plate on the tip of the nose spoiling the look of the front, in those states that require front license plates, very annoying. If the cameras and sensors were offset a bit, the plate could go in the space below the nose.

Leaving the car: In the Tesla, when you stop and ready to leave, you press the button on the shift stick and leave. In the Taycan, you need to push “P” for park located on the right of the shifter, then go to the left side of the steering wheel and turn the car off – Ugh.

I was ready to order if the car blew me away, but it didn’t. The slight hesitation, the whine in the motors, and other things (particularly range) dampened my enthusiasm. So, I think I will wait a while to see what happens and read more reviews from other owners.
 

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I have a 2016 Tesla Model S with 62,000 miles. I love the car but am ready for a change. My next car has to be electric. I’ve been following the Porsche Taycan so closely from the time it was the Mission E. I have been so excited to test drive it but am still waiting. I recently saw it and sat in it at the Porsche Experience and it is so cool and such high quality. Your review is a big help to me and my decision making process. BUT there is one huge issue I have that I just can’t get over. I am addicted to the Tesla Autopilot self steering feature. As far as I can tell the 2020 Taycan InnoDrive and Adaptive Cruise Control features just do not compare to my 2016 Model S Autopilot. That makes me so sad as I had my heart set on the new Taycan. So I guess I’ll have to be very patient and just wait for a Model S redesign. Or wishful thinking...maybe Porsche will eventually incorporate a comparable autopilot self steering feature.
I feel your pain. It’s hard to beat Tesla!
 

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I have a 2016 Tesla Model S with 62,000 miles. I love the car but am ready for a change. My next car has to be electric. I’ve been following the Porsche Taycan so closely from the time it was the Mission E. I have been so excited to test drive it but am still waiting. I recently saw it and sat in it at the Porsche Experience and it is so cool and such high quality. Your review is a big help to me and my decision making process. BUT there is one huge issue I have that I just can’t get over. I am addicted to the Tesla Autopilot self steering feature. As far as I can tell the 2020 Taycan InnoDrive and Adaptive Cruise Control features just do not compare to my 2016 Model S Autopilot. That makes me so sad as I had my heart set on the new Taycan. So I guess I’ll have to be very patient and just wait for a Model S redesign. Or wishful thinking...maybe Porsche will eventually incorporate a comparable autopilot self steering feature.
I feel your pain. It’s hard to beat Tesla!
If AP is that important to you, take a look at the BMW i4/iNEXT and BMWs plan of launching those with L3 Autonomy. VW launched "VW Autonomy" lap to develop/implement all things autonomy across its entire group. It will get there. However Porsche has already stated multiple times that Porsche remains a "driver's car" Your usual traffic assist with improvements.
 

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I have a 2016 Tesla Model S with 62,000 miles. I love the car but am ready for a change. My next car has to be electric. I’ve been following the Porsche Taycan so closely from the time it was the Mission E. I have been so excited to test drive it but am still waiting. I recently saw it and sat in it at the Porsche Experience and it is so cool and such high quality. Your review is a big help to me and my decision making process. BUT there is one huge issue I have that I just can’t get over. I am addicted to the Tesla Autopilot self steering feature. As far as I can tell the 2020 Taycan InnoDrive and Adaptive Cruise Control features just do not compare to my 2016 Model S Autopilot. That makes me so sad as I had my heart set on the new Taycan. So I guess I’ll have to be very patient and just wait for a Model S redesign. Or wishful thinking...maybe Porsche will eventually incorporate a comparable autopilot self steering feature.
I feel your pain. It’s hard to beat Tesla!
Taycan has lane keeping assist. This is what is described in the manual:

Active Lane Keeping, which uses longitudinal and lateral control to help keep the Taycan in lane and regulate the distance from vehicles in front, is also an integral part of this system – as is Traffic Jam Assist, which keeps the vehicle in the middle of the lane on congested roads, for greater comfort on longer journeys.

It also has lane change assist. But these are not as good as tesla's AP.
 
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